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20121201
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colleague from connecticut, rosa delauro, has introduced that bill year after year. you said that the federal government can borrow money, 10-year notes, even 15-year notes, somewhere around 1.5%, maybe toward 2%. if we were to borrow that, put it into an infrastructure bank and then loan money to infrastructure projects that have a cash flow, sanitation facility, water facility, toll bridges and numerous other kinds of infrastructure, which is desperately needed, we could have a financing system that over time would actually make money for the federal government. could borrow at 1.5%, loan at 1.75%, have a margin there, the money would flow back in. you'd get that revolving. the president has actually proposed this in his american jobs act. he's picked this up during his debate, the fiscal cliff negotiations, put it back on the table. we ought to be doing that. in doing so we will create tens of thousands, indeed hundreds of thousands of american jobs. american jobs. and if we couple that with buy american so that the equipment, the steel, the concrete, the other ingredients
, connecticut, speaking to the community hit by friday's elementary school shootings. it's monday, december 17, 2012. the president offered words of solidarity and state and pledged to use the power of the presidency and to prevent future killings. some are asking whether that is an indication on whether he will push for stronger gun control laws. question for you is and should u.s. gun laws change? here are the numbers to call -- you can also find us online. send us a tweet or join the conversation on facebook, or send us an e-mail. our question for you is whether u.s. gun laws should change? here's the headline in "usa today" -- jumping down into the story, it says -- others are exploring the question of gun laws. we will hear some comments from members of congress this morning. congressional democrats are vowing to push for stricter gun control laws. several democratic lawmakers called yesterday for a new push for gun restrictions, including a ban on military-style assault weapons in the wake of the connecticut massacre. democratic senator dianne feinstein is the author of an assault weapon
news alert on the investigation into the school shooting in newtown, connecticut. a new report today says police have yet to find any evidence that the accused gunman was on medication for my mental health issues. welcome to "america live", everyone. i'm megyn kelly. family members and friends described newtown gunman adam lanza suffering from some type of mental illness or mental disorder which could have contributed to the murderous rampage. but at this point police are still trying to get their hands on his medical records. a white house brief is getting underway. we expect the issue of gun violence may come up. it has in the past couple days. sunday night president obama said this was the 4th time in his presidency that a community has been torn apart by a mass shooting. he promised to do everything in his power to prevent another tragedy. several reporters pressed the press secretary jay carney on this issue, asking why the president has not done more to take the lead on this issue? >> in the october presidential debate the president said one of the debates, weapons that were de
in connecticut is outrageous and horrible. all of us are just very saddened. >> see the rest of this sequence -- segment at c-span.org. >> io am davejkeane president of the national rifle association and i would like to welcome you to begin our discussion of the topic that has been on the minds of american parents across this country. that is -- what do we do about the tragedy of the sort that struck in newtown, conn. to avoid such events in the future? like most americans, we were shocked by what happened. like all americans, we have been discussing all of the various options that are available to protect our children and, at this point, we would like to share our thinking with few. that purpose, i like to introduce wayne lapierre our executive vice president. at the end of this conference, we will not be taking questions that next week, we will be available to any of you who are interested in talking about these or other issues of interest. contact us, please, at that point, thank you very much. wayne? >> good morning. the national rifle association, 4 million others -- mothers, fathers, so
? >> jeff, thank you very much. >>> ten days after the connecticut school shooting, the debate over gun control continues after the national rifle association took questions for the first time since newtown. america's largest gun rights group says we don't need new laws. chip reid is in washington with that story. chip, good morning. >> reporter: good morning, jeff. the national rifle association was silent in the days following the tragedy in newtown. now it's speaking out and reigniteing an explosive debate over gun control. the nra says it will not budge from its longtime opposition to gun control, insisting the only thing that will stop school shootings is armed guards. >> if it's crazy to call for putting police and armed security in our school to protect our children, then call me crazy. i think the american people think it's crazy not to do it. it's the one thing that would keep people safe and the nra is going to try to do that. >> reporter: nra president david kean added that banning particular guns simply doesn't work. >> we had a so-called assault weapon
. national rifle association breaking its silence one week after the horrific school shooting in connecticut. proposing armed guards and teachers at every school in america. is that a good idea. we're going to debate that next. then a u.p.s. driver does last minute christmas shopping on a customer's front porch. we have got the video that got him in trouble. let's give thanks - for an idea. a grand idea called america. the idea that if you work hard, if you have a dream, if you work with your neighbors... you can do most anything. this led to other ideas like lerty and rock 'n' roll. to free markets, free enterprise, and free refills. it put a man on the moon and a phone in your pocket. our country's gone through a lot over the centuries and a half. but this idea isn't fragile. when times get tough, it rallies us as one. every day, more people believe in the american idea and when they do, the dream comes true. we're grateful to be a part of it. [ male announcer ] it started long ago. the joy of giving something everything you've got. it takes passion. and it's not letting up anytime soon. a
interviews to the economy former member of congress from connecticut and i am the president of the united states capitol and historical society. this interview with senator daniel inouye is part of a special series featuring asian-pacific members of congress. in these interviews current and fellow members have relived their memories of people, places and events that have shaped their public career. it is our hope that these recollections will provide listeners with a deeper appreciation prehuman dimension of representative government in this temple of liberty we know as the united states capitol. senator daniel inouye was born in honolulu hawaii on september 7th, 1924 and was named after a methodist minister who had adopted his mother. in march, 1943, he enlisted in the u.s. army's 44 regimental a team. he saw combat in italy and southern france and was badly wounded during an engagement for which he was awarded the distinguished service cross which was later upgraded to the medal of honor, the highest award for military valor. with financial assistance from the g.i. bill, inouye graduate
us on the democratic line from connecticut. caller: good morning. my question is, in watching c- span over the years, i noticed there was once an episode where an economist talked-about a world view on reducing the imprint of the military and using limited black ops and to intervene in situations to quell unrest in the discos along with the things like the economy -- this goes along with things like the economy. my question is how do you see us going black ops and the cia? is this not what we did in afghanistan? guest: i understand there is a very wrong perception among the public that all special ops do are black ops and unilateral raids in the dead of night. that perception is widely held. in the case of columbia, the philippines, yemen, these other places that i am talking about, the governments have invited special operations forces in to help them, to help their country's forces. that is why i think it is such an effective use in the long term. it does not cause the same political diplomatic controversy as many people know what happened after the bin laden rate. it was a huge rup
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)